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Amy Marga

Amy Marga
Associate Professor of Systematic Theology
Luther Seminary
St. Paul, Minn.

Amy Marga is Associate Professor of Systematic Theology. She has been at Luther since 2006.  A summa cum laude graduate of Concordia University, St Paul, MN (1995), she received a Master of Divinity (1998) and Doctor of Philosophy (2006) from Princeton Theological Seminary.

She is the author of Karl Barth’s Dialogue with Catholicism in Göttingen and Münster (2010), the translator of Karl Barth’s The Word of God and Theology (2011), and a contributing translator to Barth in Conversation: Volume 1, 1959-1962, (2017). She is also the author of several essays about Karl Barth’s theology including in The Westminster Handbook to Karl Barth; the Karl-Barth Handbuch; and Thomas Aquinas and Karl Barth: An Unofficial Catholic-Protestant Dialogue (White and McCormack, editors). 

More recently, she has published “From ‘Herr Käthe’ to Here I Stand: A White Feminist Perspective on Martin Luther’s Life and Theology” in Touchstone Journal, Toronto, (2017).

Her present research focuses on Feminism, and Mothering in the Christian tradition. A selection of scholarly papers given on this topic include those given at the American Academy of Religion on “White Mothers, Black Mothers and the Bible” (2016), “The Redeeming Act of Giving Birth: Martin Luther’s Theology Concerning the Bodies of Mothers” (2014), and “Children in the Theologies of Luther and Barth” (2015).

Marga is a trained racial justice facilitator through the Minneapolis YWCA and teaches a course on Race and Protestantism at Luther Seminary. She enjoys speaking on feminism, gender, race, and the Christian tradition in local congregations. She lives in St Paul with her husband, two boys, and a poodle.

She is also a member of the Karl Barth Translators’ Group at the Barth Center, Princeton, NJ, the North American Karl Barth Society, and the American Academy of Religion.

Contributions